U.S. Patents held by Douglas C. Engelbart 0

All Patents1

Filed Granted Patent No. Device Where
Invented
Assignor
To
1a
11/28/1956 08/12/1958 2,847,603 Glow discharge device. UCB: EE DT, Inc. 1b
11/28/1956 08/12/1958 2,847,615 Memory device. UCB: EE DT, Inc. 1c
05/29/1956 01/13/1959 2,869,036 Glow discharge devices. UCB: EE DT, Inc. 1d
07/12/1955 02/02/1960 2,923,853 Electric discharge device. UCB: EE DT, Inc 1e
11/28/1956 02/16/1960 2,925,530 Luminous display device. UCB: EE DT, Inc 1f
05/29/1956 05/17/1960 2,937,317 Glow discharge devices. UCB: EE DT, Inc. 1g
06/12/1958 05/10/1960 2,936,445 Multiple-setting magnetic core circuits.
Co-Inventor: David R. Bennion
SRI: ALMC SRI 1h
10/30/1958 02/07/1961 2,971,123 Electronic discharge device. UCB: EE DT, Inc 1i
11/28/1956 05/16/1961 2,984,765 Electric controlled information bearing device. UCB: EE DT, Inc 1j
06/08/1960 01/14/1961 3,009,136 Flux-doubling in magnetic cores.
Co-Inventors: David R. Bennion, Edwin K. van de Riet.
SRI: ALMC SRI 1k
02/09/1959 03/26/1963 3,083,355 Magnetic logic device. SRI: ALMC SRI 1l
10/19/1959 01/19/1963 3,111,588 Combined synthetic and multiaperture magnetic-core system. SRI: ALMC SRI 1m
10/19/1959 01/26/1963 3,112,409 Combined synthetic and multiaperture magnetic-core system. SRI: ALMC SRI 1n
01/19/1960 07/07/1964 3,140,402 Magnetic-core logic circuits. SRI: ALMC SRI 1o
10/29/1959 02/29/1964 3,163,854 Magnetic flux transfer in core systems. SRI: ALMC AMP, Inc. 1p
11/05/1962 07/13/1965 3,195,117 Bipolar magnetic core circuit. SRI: ALMC AMP, Inc. 1q
02/20/1961 09/21/1965 3,208,052 Bidirectional shift register utilizing flux pumping.
Co-Inventor: David R. Bennion
SRI: ALMC AMP, Inc. 1r
11/23/1962 01/11/1966 3,229,267 Magnetic core device.
Co-Inventor: Lawrence G. Wiley
SRI: ALMC AMP, Inc. 1s
01/19/1960 02/13/1966 3,292,163 Magnetic-core logic circuits. SRI: ALMC AMP, Inc. 1t
10/30/1959 03/26/1968 3,375,505 Magnetic flux transfer in core systems. SRI: ALMC AMP, Inc. 1u
06/21/1967 01/17/1970 3,541,541 X-Y position indicator for a display system. SRI: ARC SRI 1v

NOTES:

UCB and DT, Inc. = University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and Digital Techniques, Inc (DT). Engelbart's doctoral research on computer storage devices, conducted 1952-1955 at UC Berkeley School of Engineering, Dept. of Electrical Engineering (EE), resulted in eight patents, in addition to his PhD dissertation A Study of High-Frequency Gas-Conduction Electronics in Digital Computers. In 1956 he formed the startup Digital Techniques, Inc. to commercialize that research, but soon found a better home at Stanford Research Institute (SRI).

SRI and AMP, Inc. = Stanford Research Institute (SRI) and Aircraft Marine Products (AMP). Engelbart's first major research assignment at SRI 1957-1960 was on the All-Magnetic Logic Computer (ALMC), which earned him another dozen patents. Technology from this program was commercialized by Aircraft Marine Products (AMP) Inc., under license from SRI, and used primarily in the rapid transit system of New York City and at railroad switching yards, where electro-magnetic interference made electronic computers unfeasible. In 1959, Engelbart got the green light to pursue his own research on Augmenting the Human Intellect, at first half time, and then full time once his funding came through.

X-Y Position Indicator and SRI ARC = technical name for the computer mouse and the Augmentation Research Center (ARC) at SRI. Engelbart's final patent was for the invention of the computer mouse in 1964, filed in 1967 and awarded in 1970. SRI licensed the technology to Apple, Xerox, and other companies, but the invention was not commercially viable until 1984 when Apple release the Macintosh, three years before the patent's expiration. See The Mouse Patent below, and visit SRI's The Computer Mouse and Interactive Computing and our Father of the Mouse for online exhibits and links to more. This invention was a small part of a larger research program on Augmenting the Human Intellect, which Engelbart conceived and directed at the SRI ARC 1959-1977. A constellation of groundbreaking pioneering firsts emerged – such as the mouse and interactive computing, display editing, outline processing, linking and in-file object addressing, use of multiple windows, hypermedia and context-sensitive help, shared screen teleconferencing, the Mother of All Demos, networked digital libraries and online communities, and more – but only the mouse was deemed patentable.

The Mouse Patent 2

Doug Engelbart's patent on the computer mouse, titled X-Y position indicator for a display system (3,541,541), filed June 21, 1967 and granted January 17, 1970, was described in the patent's Abstract as follows: 2a

"An X-Y position indicator control for movement by the hand over any surface to move a cursor over the display on a cathode ray tube, the indicator control generating signals indicating its position to cause a cursor to be displayed on the tube at the corresponding position. The indicator control mechanism contains X and Y position wheels mounted perpendicular to each other, which rotate according to the X and Y movements of the mechanism, and which operate rheostats to send signals along a wire to a computer which controls the CRT display."
Figures 1-3. Diagrams from the patent document.
2b


Learn more about Engelbart's mouse invention and his overarching vision that drove the research at our Father of the Mouse exhibit portal.2c